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Legislative Terminology — The Same but Different

In my last blog, I covered a lot of the variations I find around the world. I do a lot of document analysis, working to map various legislative traditions into Akoma Ntoso. Doing the job right sometime means understanding nuances and resisting the temptation to apply rules learned elsewhere.

There are a number of terms that often require very careful consideration:

  • In legislation in the English speaking world, the “middle” layer is usually the Section. Numbering is sequential starting at the beginning of the document and continuing to the end of the document regardless of the hierarchy above. In non-English speaking countries, this level is the Article and the Section is a upper level like a Part or Chapter.

    However, there are exceptions. In the US Constitution, this practice is not followed. In the US Constitution, sections are found in articles. This arrangement is the opposite way around to European legislation where articles are found in sections. This doesn’t really make a lot of sense. In a newspaper, articles are found in sections of the paper like the business or sports section. This same structure exists in HTML5. Perhaps Thomas Jefferson and the other framer’s of the US Constitution were trying to add a bit of European flair to their work, but got the order backwards. Many Constitutions around the world are modelled on the US Constitution and adopt the same unusual Article/Section arrangement.

    One quirk I came across lately was most confusing and presented an interesting conundrum. While the prevailing practices in the jurisdiction were British in tradition, a few statutes adopted a more European style. The sections were numbered sequentially and always referred to as sections. However, the numbering never explicitly calls out the level type (e.g. the section number is “2.” rather than “Sec 2.”) Nonetheless, knowing that this level is a Section, we had modelled the sections as akn:section. However, we then discovered a small handful of statutes that had upper level sections as found in European legislation (e.g. SECTION 3). So, in these documents, there were two complete difference types of constructs both called sections. While this was probably an error caused by drafting rules not being enforced properly, the result was enacted law containing this error. We ended up using an akn:hcontainer with a @name = section to create another distinct type of Section.
  • One common area of confusion is the use of plurals. We see this all over the place. For example, in some jurisdictions, the Section type construct is known as a Regulation and the document containing them is called Regulations. Other jurisdictions refer to the sections as Section, and the document itself is the Regulation.

    This same practice is found with rules, but in that case, the section type construct is called a Rule and the document is known as Rules. In this case, this naming practice is nearly universal.

    We find this same inconsistency with Bill Amendments. In some jurisdiction, each individual change is referred to as an Amendment and the collective whole are Amendments or an Amendment List. In other jurisdictions the individual changes are known as Instructions and the collective whole is the Amendment. This difference can be confusing when mapping to Akoma Ntoso as that schema implies the former convention as this is more common in Europe while the latter approach is more prevalent in the U.S.
  • Another area of confusion is the difference between an Annex and a Schedule. The European concept of an Annex is separate document treated somewhat as an attachment to the base document. However, a Schedule is different — it clearly a part of the Body of the document. While it is most often found at the end of the body of the document, in some jurisdictions which complex hierarchical structures, schedules can also be found at the end of any upper hierarchical level. This construct is one that cannot currently be modelled in Akoma Ntoso without resorting to akn:hcontainer although the proposed next version includes akn:schedule to rectify this.

Mapping a jurisdiction’s legislation into Akoma Ntoso can be tricky. The mapping isn’t always straightforward and almost always an exhaustive analysis of the entire body of existing laws will reveal that there are no hard and fast rules. As existing law can’t just be “fixed” to be consistent, it is often necessary to come up with creative ways to handles the oddities that are found.

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Uncategorized

Comparing DOCX to Akoma Ntoso for Legislation

After describing what makes for good legislative XML, I feel I should bring up a favorite topic of mine — why word processors don’t make for good legislative drafting tools.

Lately, we’ve been implementing round tripping tools to allow Akoma Ntoso documents to be imported and exported from Microsoft Word. This is to facilitate migration from a largely office productivity-oriented system to an XML-based one and to allow the exchange of documents with external clients that don’t have access to the internal systems being used to draft and manage legislation. It’s been quite a difficult process. The round-tripping itself has been quite straight forward. Exporting a document is relatively easy and reimporting that exported document, unchanged, isn’t difficult. What is very problematic is trying to ingest documents drafted or extensively edited using a word processor. The DOCX markup quickly becomes a tangled mess. Even when a document looks fine visually, there can be a lot going wrong on the inside, revealing the drafter’s struggle with the word processor to get a document that at least looks right. To avoid the problematic mess, we tend to resort to interpreting the words and discarding the structure and internal metadata entirely. It’s not perfect, but it’s at least manageable.

I’m going to compare the prominent word processing format today, DOCX (well, at least the WordprocessingML part of it) to Akoma Ntoso in respect to how they stack up to each other on my list:

  • Is it semantic?
    DOCX: No, not at all. DOCX is a serialization of the inner workings of Microsoft Word. It makes no attempt to be anything else.
    Akoma Ntoso: Yes, this is the fundamental approach Akoma Ntoso takes.
  • Is the presentation separated from the semantics as much as possible?
    DOCX: No, the presentation is tied directly into the document itself, and what’s more, is very proprietary.
    Akoma Ntoso: Yes, although you can apply presentation directly inline in cases, such as tables, where necessary.
  • Is all the text (excluding any metadata section) in the natural reading order?
    DOCX: Yes, for the most part.
    Akoma Ntoso: Yes, for the most part.
  • Does it, to the fullest extent possible, avoid the use of generated text?
    DOCX: No, and this is one of the most frustrating and infuriating parts of working with DOCX.
    Akoma Ntoso: Mostly, but it doesn’t preclude practices that ensure this rule is followed.
  • Is every provision that needs data associated with it permanently identifiable?
    DOCX: Mostly.
    Akoma Ntoso: Yes, via the @wId or the @GUID attributes.
  • Is every provision that is referred to easily locatable?
    DOCX: Not without extensive customization.
    Akoma Ntoso: Yes, via a standardized locator mechanism using the @eId/@wId attributes.
  • If the XML schema is for general use, is there an extensible way to add missing constructs?
    DOCX: No, unless you regard styling as your constructs (a bad idea) or want a complex customization task.
    Akoma Ntoso: Yes, via the seven elements found in the generic model.
  • Is there an extensible metadata mechanism?
    DOCX: Yes, but it’s complicated.
    Akoma Ntoso: Yes, but it’s complicated.
  • Does it provide the facilities necessary to automate according to modern expectations?
    DOCX: No, the presentation oriented structure of DOCX does little to enable downstream automation.
    Akoma Ntoso: Yes, Akoma Ntoso encourages a hierarchical content structure that is ideal for downstream automation.

Of course, Akoma Ntoso looks a lot better for legislative documents than does DOCX files. That should be no surprise — Akoma Ntoso is purpose-built for legislation while DOCX is a general purpose document model intended for no single purpose. But it is also fundamentally very different. While Akoma Ntoso is designed to be in modern standards-based document information model for legislation, DOCX is a serialization of the archaic data structures that exist within Microsoft Word. DOCX reflects the proprietary inner workings of Microsoft Word rather than the semantic meanings to be found within a document.

Akoma Ntoso has its drawbacks too. It’s complex, a bit academic, and has to span a very broad range of legal traditions make it a good fit for most legislative traditions, but a perfect fit for none.

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Uncategorized

LegisPro edit will soon be ready for beta!

Our new rulemaking LegisProedit is coming along nicely. It’s a web-based XML drafting tool specifically designed for the rigors of rulemaking tasks such as legislative bill drafting. It supports both the Akoma Ntoso and the USLM legislative models and can be customized to support any other model if necessary.

This past week I gave a demonstration of it at the LEX US Summer School at George Mason University in Washington D.C. With trepidation, I allowed everyone to have a hands-on experience with it as I provided guidance. This was the first time the editor had been used by anyone outside of Xcential and the first time we had stressed server performance. While certainly not glitch free, the editor exceeded my expectations for this point in the development process and all went well. It worked!

This week we are talking about the editor at NCSL by way of a screenshot demo that I am sharing here:

The next opportunities to try the editor hands-on will be at the LEX Summer School in Ravenna, Italy next month and we will also be showing it later in the month at NALIT in Sacramento, California.

The QuickStarter beta program is still in the process of being finalized. We are currently envisioning different levels of participation, from basic beta testing to a full-fledged evaluation program for anyone looking to use it or a part of it in an upcoming project.

More information can be found at http://xcential.com/legispro or you can contact us at info@xcential.com.

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Akoma Ntoso, HTML5, LegisPro Web, LEX Summer School, Standards, Transparency

Data Transparency Breakfast, LEX US Summer School 2015, First International Akoma Ntoso Conference, and LegisPro Edit reveal.

Last week was a very good week for my company, Xcential.

We started the week hosting a breakfast put on by the Data Transparency Coalition at the Booz Allen Hamilton facility in Washington D.C.. The topic was Transforming Law and Regulation. Unfortunately, an issue at home kept me away but I was able to make a brief pre-recorded presentation and my moderating role was played by Mark Stodder, our company President. Thank you, Mark!

Next up was the first U.S. edition of the LEX Summer School from Italy. I have attended this summer school every year since 2010 in Italy and it’s great to see the same opportunity for an open dialog amongst the legal informatics community finally come to the U.S. Monica Palmirani (@MonicaPalmirani), Fabio Vitali, and Luca Cervone (@lucacervone) put on the event from the University of Bologna. The teachers also included Jim Mangiafico  (@mangiafico) (the LoC data challenge winner), Veronique Parisse (@VeroParisse) from the European Union, Andrew Weber (@atweber) from the Library of Congress, Kirsten Gullickson (@GullicksonK) from the Office of the Clerk at the U.S. House of Representatives, and myself from Xcential. I flew in for an abbreviated visit covering the last two days of the Summer School where I covered how the U.S. Code is modeled in Akoma Ntoso and gave the students an opportunity to try out our new bill drafting editor — LegisProedit.

After the Summer School concluded, it was followed by the first International Akoma Ntoso Conference on Saturday, where I spoke about the architecture of our new editor as well as how the USLM schema is a derivative of the Akoma Ntoso schema. We had good turnout, from around the world, and a number of interesting speakers.

This week is NCSL in Seattle where we will be discussing our new editor with potential customers and partners. Mark Stodder from Xcential will be in attendance.

In a month, I’ll be in Ravenna once more for the European LEX Summer School — where I’ll be able to show even more progress towards the goal of a full product line of Akoma Ntoso tools. It’s interesting times for me.

The editor is coming along nicely and we’re beginning to firm up our QuickStarter beta plans. I’ve already received a number of requests and will be getting in touch with everyone as soon as we’re ready to roll out the program. If you would like to participate as a beta tester — or if you would just like more information, please contact us at info@xcential.com.

I’m really excited about how far we’ve come. Akoma Ntoso is on the verge of being certified as an official OASIS standard, our Akoma Ntoso products are coming into place, and interest around the world is growing. I can’t wait to see where we will be this time next year.

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Akoma Ntoso, HTML5, LegisPro Web, LEX Summer School, Standards, Track Changes, W3C

Coming soon!!! A new web-based editor for Akoma Ntoso

I’ve been working hard for a long time — building an all new web-based editor for Akoma Ntoso. We will be showing it for the first time at the upcoming Akoma Ntoso LEX Summer School in Washington D.C.

Unlike our earlier AKN/Editor, this editor is a pure XML editor designed from the ground up using the XML capabilities that modern browsers possess. This editor is much more robust, more precise,  and is very scalable.

NewEditor

Basic Features

  1. Configurable XML models — including Akoma Ntoso and USLM
  2. Edit full documents or portions of large documents
  3. Flexible selection and editing regardless of XML structure
  4. Built-in redlining (change tracking) supporting textual AND structural changes
  5. Browse document sources with drag-and-drop.
  6. Full undo & redo
  7. Customizable attribute editor
  8. Search and replace
  9. Modular architecture to allow for extensive customization

Underlying Technology

  1. XML-based editing component
    • DOM 4 support
    • XPath Support
    • CSS Styling
    • Sophisticated event model
  2. HTTP-based resolver architecture for retrieving documents
    • Interpret citations
    • Deference URLs
    • WebDAV adaptors to document repositories
    • Query repositories with XQuery or databases with SQL
  3. AngularJS-based User Interface using HTML5
    • Component modules for easy customization
  4. XML repository for storing documents
    • Integrate any XML repository
    • Built-in support for eXist-db
  5. Validation & Publishing
    • XML Schema validator
    • XSL-FO publishing

We’ll reveal a lot more at the LEX Summer School later this month! If you’re interested in our QuickStart beta program, drop me a note at grant.vergottini@xcential.com.

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Akoma Ntoso, LEX Summer School, Standards

Upcoming U.S. and European events related to Akoma Ntoso

In my last blog post I covered the public review of the new proposed Akoma Ntoso (LegalDocML) standard for legal documents. Please keep the comments coming. In order to comment, please send email to legaldocml-comment@lists.oasis-open.org. If you wish to subscribe to this mailing list, please follow the instructions at https://www.oasis-open.org/committees/comments/index.php?wg_abbrev=legaldocml

In addition, there are three upcoming events related to Akoma Ntoso which you may wish to participate in: (this list coming from Monica Palmirani, the chair of the OASIS LegalDocML technical committee)

1. Akoma Ntoso Summer School, 27-31 July, 2015, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia (USA): http://aknschool.cirsfid.unibo.it
Registration fee: http://aknschool.cirsfid.unibo.it/logistics/registrations-and-fees/
Application Form: http://aknschool.cirsfid.unibo.it/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/ApplicationForm.pdf
Brochure:
http://aknschool.cirsfid.unibo.it/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/brochure_2015_US_DEF.pdf
Deadline: end of June, 2015.

2. IANC2015 (First International Akoma Ntoso Conference): August 1st, 2015, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia (USA)
Brochure: http://aknschool.cirsfid.unibo.it/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/AKN-CONFERENCE1.pdf
Call for contributions:
http://www.akomantoso.org/akoma-ntoso-conference/call-for-contributions/
Deadline: June 19th, 2015.

3. Summer School LEX2015, 7-15 Sept. 2015, Ravenna, Italy: http://summerschoollex.cirsfid.unibo.it
Registration fee: http://summerschoollex.cirsfid.unibo.it/?page_id=66
Application Form: http://summerschoollex.cirsfid.unibo.it/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/ApplicationForm2.pdf
Brochure:
http://summerschoollex.cirsfid.unibo.it/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/brochure_2015_LEX1.pdf
Deadline: July, 15th, 2015.

I have been participating in the European LEX Summer school every year since 2010 and find it to be both inspirational and very valuable. If you’re interested in understanding where the legal informatics field is headed, I encourage you to find a way to attend any of these events. I will be speaking/teaching at all three events.

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Akoma Ntoso, LegisPro Web, LEX Summer School, Standards, Track Changes

Akoma Ntoso (LegalDocML) is now available for public review

It’s been many years in the making, but the standardised version of Akoma Ntoso is now finally in public review. You can find the official announcement here. The public review started May 7th and will end on June 5th — which is quite a short time for something so complex.

I would like to encourage everything to take part in this review process, as short as it is. It’s important that we get good coverage from around the world to ensure that any use cases we missed get due consideration. Instructions for how to comment can be found here.

Akoma Ntoso is a complex standard and it has many parts. If you’re new to Akoma Ntoso, it will probably be quite overwhelmed. To try and cut through that complexity, I’m going to try and give a bit of an overview of what the documentation covers, and what to be looking for.

There are four primary documents

  1. Akoma Ntoso Version 1.0 Part 1: XML Vocabulary — This document is the best place to start. It’s an overview of Akoma Ntoso and describes what all the pieces are and how they fit together.
  2. Akoma Ntoso Version 1.0 Part 2: Specifications — This is the reference material. When you want to know something specific about an Akoma Ntoso XML element or attribute, this is the document to go to. In contains very detailed information derived from the schema itself. Also included with this is the XML schema (or DTD if you’re still inclined to use DTDs). and a good set of examples from around the world.
  3. Akoma Ntoso Naming Convention Version 1.0. This document describes two very interrelated and important aspects of the proposed standard — how identifitiers are assigned to elements and how IRI-based (or URI-based) references are formed. There is a lot of complexity in this topic and it was the subject to numerous meetings and an interesting debate at the Coco Loco restaurant in Ravenna, Italy, one evening while being eaten by mosquitoes.
  4. Akoma Ntoso Media Type Version 1.0 — This fourth document describes a proposed new media type that will be used when transmitting Akoma Ntoso documents.

This is a lot of information to read and digest in a very short amount of time. In my opinion, the best way to try and evaluate Akoma Ntoso’s applicability to your jurisdiction is as follows:

  • First, look at the basic set of tags used to define the document hierarchy. Is this set of tags adequate. Keep in mind that the terminology might not always perfectly align with your terminology. We had to find a neutral terminology that would allow us to define a super-set of the concepts found throughout the world.
  • If you do find that specific elements you need are missing, consider whether or not that concept is perhaps specific to your jurisdiction. If that is the case, take a look at the basic Akoma Ntoso building blocks that are provided. While we tried to provide a comprehensive set of elements and attributes, there are many situations which are simply too esoteric to justify the additional tag bloat in the basic standard. Can the building blocks be used to model those concepts?
  • Take a look at the identifiers and the referencing specification. These parts are intended to work together to allow you to identifier and access any provision in an Akoma Ntoso document. Are all your possible needs met with this? Implicit in this design is a resolver architecture — a component that parses IRI references (think of them as URLs) and maps to specific provisions. Is this approach workable?
  • Take a look at the basic metadata requirements. Akoma Ntoso has a sophisticated metadata methodology behind it and this involves quite a bit of indirection at times. Understand what the basic metadata needs are and how you would model your jurisdictions metadata using this.
  • Finally, if you have time, take a look at the more advanced aspects of Akoma Ntoso. Consider how information related to the documents lifecycle and workflow might be modeled within the metadata. Consider your change management needs and whether or not the change management capabilities of Akoma Ntoso could be adapted to fit. If you work with complex composite documents, take a look at the mechanisms Akoma Ntoso provides to assemble composite documents.

Yes, there is a lot to digest in just a few weeks. Please provide whatever feedback you can.

We’re also now in the planning stages for a US LEX Summer School. If you’ve followed my blog over the years, you’ll know that I am a huge fan of the LEX Summer School in Ravenna, Italy — I’ve been every year for the past five years. This year, Kirsten Gullikson and I convinced Monica and Fabio to bring the Summer School to Washington D.C. as well. The summer school will be held the last week of July 2015 at George Mason University. The class size will be limited to just 30, so be sure to register early once registration opens. If you want to hear me rattle on at length about this subject, this is the place to go — I’ll be one of the teachers. The Summer School will conclude with a one day Akoma Ntoso Conference on the Saturday. We’ll be looking for papers. I’ll send out a blog with additional information as soon as it’s finalized.

You may have noticed that I’ve been blogging a lot less lately. Well, that’s because I’ve been heads down for quite some time. We’ll soon be in a position to announce our first full Akoma Ntoso product. It’s an all new web-based XML editor that builds on our experiences with the HTML5 based AKN/Editor (LegisPro Web) that we built before.

This editor is composed of four main parts.

  1. First, there is a full XML editing component that works with pure XML — allowing it to be quite scalable and very XML precise. It implements complex track changes capabilities along with full redo/undo. I’m quite thrilled how it has turned out. I’ve battled for years with XMetaL’s limitations and this was my opportunity to properly engineer a modern XML editor.
  2. Second, there is a sophisticated resolver technology which acts as the middleware, implementing the URI scheme I mentioned earlier — and interfacing with local and remote document resources. All local document resources are managed within an eXist-db repository.
  3. Third, there is the Akoma Ntoso model. The XML editing component is quite schema/model independent. This allows it to be used with a wide variety of structured documents. The Akoma Ntoso model adapts the editor for use with Akoma Ntoso documents.
  4. And finally, there is a very componentised application which ties all the pieces together. This application is written as an AngularJS-based single page application (SPA). In an upcoming blog I’ll detail the trials and tribulations of learning AngularJS. While learning AngularJS has left me thinking I’m quite stupid at times, the goal has been to build an application that can easily be extended to fit a wide variety of structured editing needs. It’s important that all the pieces be defined as modules that can either be swapped out for bespoke implementations or complemented with additional capabilities.

Our current aim is to have the beta version of this new editor available in time for the Summer School and Akoma Ntoso conference — so I’ll be very heads down through most of the summer.

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Akoma Ntoso, Standards

And now for something completely different… Chinese!

Last week we saw how Akoma Ntoso can be applied to a very large consolidated Code – the United States Code. This week we take the challenge in a different direction – applying Akoma Ntoso to a bilingual implementation involving a totally different writing system. Our test document this week is the Hong Kong Basic Law. This document serves as the constitutional document of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China. It was adopted on the 4 April 1990 and went into effect on July 1, 1997 when the United Kingdom handed over the region to the People’s Republic of China.

The Hong Kong Basic Law is available in English, Traditional Chinese, and Simplified Chinese. For our exercise, we are demonstrating the document in English and in Traditional Chinese. (Thank you to Patrick for doing the conversion for me.) Fortunately, using modern technologies, supporting Chinese characters alongside Latin characters is quite straightforward. Unicode provides a Hong Kong supplementary character set to handle characters unique to Hong Kong. The biggest challenge is ensuring that all the unicode declarations throughout the various XML and HTML files that the information must flow through are set correctly. With the number of accents we find in names in California as well as the rigorous nature of California’s publishing rules, getting Unicode right is something we have grown accustomed to.

While I hadn’t expected there to be any problems with Unicode, I was pleasently surprised to find that the fonts used in Legix simply worked with the Traditional Chinese characters without issue as well. (Well at least as far as I can tell without the ability to actually read Chinese)

The only issue we encountered was Internet Explorer’s support for CSS3. Apparently, IE still does not recognize “list-style-type” with a value of “cjk-ideographic”. So instead of getting Traditional Chinese numerals, we get Arabic numerals. The other browsers handled this much better.

So what other considerations were there? A big consideration was the referencing mechanism. To me, modeling how you refer to something in an information model can be more important than the information model itself. The referencing mechanism defines how the information is organized and allows you to address a specific piece of information in a very precise and accurate way. Done right, any piece of information can be accessed very quickly and easily. Done wrong and you get chaos.

Our referencing mechanism relies on the Functional Requirements for Bibliographical Records (FRBR). This mechanism is used by both SLIM and Akomantoso. Another interesting FRBR proposal for legislation can be found here.

FRBR defines an information model based on a hierarchical scheme of Work-Expression-Manifestion-Item. Think of the work as the overall document being addressed, the expression being the version desired, the manifestation the format you want to information presented in, and finally the item as a means for addressing a specific instance of the information. Typically we’re only concerend with Work-Expression-Manifestation.

For a bilingual or multilingual system, the “expression” part of the reference is used to specify which language you wish the document to be returned in. If you check out the references at Legix.info you will see that the two references the the Hong Kong Basic Law are:

The expressions are called out as “doc;en-uk” for the English version and “doc;zh-yue” for the Chinese version. Relatively straightforward. The manifestations are not shown and the result is the default manifestation of HTML.

Check the samples out and let me know what you think.

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